Carpal Tunnel Specialist

The Center for Neurology and Neurophysiology, PA

Neurologists located in Frisco, TX & Southlake, TX

Pain, numbness, and tingling in your hand and arm may be a sign of carpal tunnel syndrome, but the expert team at The Center for Neurology and Neurophysiology, PA, can help. They diagnose and treat carpal tunnel syndrome at their location in Frisco, Texas. Most cases of carpal tunnel syndrome only get worse over time, so you should call your nearest office or book an appointment online to address your symptoms right away.

Carpal Tunnel Q & A

What is carpal tunnel syndrome?

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common cause of pain and numbness in your hand and arm. This condition happens when a nerve becomes compressed passing through a narrow passageway in your wrist called the carpal tunnel.

Without treatment, carpal tunnel syndrome may eventually lead to nerve damage. The team at The Center for Neurology and Neurophysiology provides effective treatments to relieve pain and tingling and restore normal functioning to your wrist and hand.  

What are the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome?

Most of the time, carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms begin gradually and become worse over time. Common symptoms include:

  • Tingling, numbness, pain, or a burning sensation in the fingers
  • Shock-like sensations that radiate into the fingers
  • Pain or tingling that travels from the forearm up to the shoulder
  • Weakness of the hand and a tendency to drop things

Carpal tunnel syndrome primarily affects fingers served by the median nerve, including the thumb, index, middle, and ring fingers.

What causes carpal tunnel syndrome?

Carpal tunnel syndrome is the result of pressure on your median nerve. Though this condition can affect anyone, studies show that women and older adults are more likely to develop carpal tunnel syndrome.

Several factors may increase your risk of getting carpal tunnel syndrome, including:

  • Activities that require repetitive hand and wrist motions, such as typing at a keyboard
  • Nerve-damaging conditions, such as diabetes
  • Hormonal changes during pregnancy or menopause
  • Jobs that require using your hand and wrist for long periods

If you have a job that requires using your hands for long periods of time, taking frequent breaks to bend and stretch your hands and wrists may help prevent carpal tunnel syndrome.  

How do you diagnose and treat carpal tunnel syndrome?

To diagnose carpal tunnel syndrome, the team at The Center for Neurology and Neurophysiology begins with a physical exam and review of your medical history. They may also take tests, such as an electromyogram (EMG) or nerve conduction study.

Then, they develop a personalized treatment plan tailored to your unique needs. Depending on the severity of your carpal tunnel syndrome, treatment may include:

  • Anti-inflammatory medicine
  • Steroid injections
  • Wearing a wrist splint

Severe cases of carpal tunnel syndrome may require surgery to relieve pressure on the nerve. To learn more about your options for carpal tunnel syndrome treatment, call The Center for Neurology and Neurophysiology or book an appointment online.